Stories From Behind the Camera: Iconic Portraits

Stories From Behind the Camera: Iconic Portraits

Stories From Behind the Camera: The World’s Most Iconic Portraits Some iconic photographs last longer in the mind because of the subject. There’s nothing more interesting to people than other people. In our inaugural insight of ‘Stories from Behind the Camera’, we will look at some of the world’s most iconic portraits and reveal the interesting stories that made them iconic. Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry (1984) Sharbat Gula is captured by photojournalist McCurry in a Pakistani refugee camp during the time of the Soviet Union’s occupation of Afghanistan. Although, Sharbat wasn’t identified as the girl until 2002 by which time she was in her 30’s. The portrait is revered for a number of reasons. Some cite it is the ‘Mona Lisa of the Third World’ and others say it is a depiction of oppression on society. This photograph was first published on the front cover of National Geographic in 1985 and became an instant talking point. Gula’s red headscarf and the green background is striking, along with her piercing stare underlining McCurry’s ability as a photojournalist. Gula was eventually credited as the Afghan Girl in 2002 using iris recognition technology. She can still remember the moment that McCurry took the photograph. Copyright: Steve McCurry (1984) Copyright: Dorothea Lange (1936) Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange (1936) Taken in the middle of America’s Great Depression, Lange’s portrait of Florence Owens Thompson and her children shows the effects that hyperinflation and lack of employment had on the American people during the 1930s. Thompson was only 32 in the portrait but is often mistaken for a lot older. Generally, this is an attribute of...
Capturing Mother’s Day

Capturing Mother’s Day

Capturing Mother’s Day Mother’s Day photography must start with us DEFINING THE WORD MOTHER: Wife, Sister, Lover, Housekeeper, lifesaver, chef, mentor, teacher, guardian angel, nurse, coach, storyteller, monster killer, planner, organizer, decorator, crafter, best friend, multi-tasking queen, superwoman……a woman we couldn’t live without. Mother’s Day photography on Mothering Sunday should be a day spent honouring the women who brought us into the world. A pretty big deal huh? So, if you are looking to surprise your Mum on this special day, there is nothing more unique than with a little bit of Mother’s Day photography. Therefore, this will be a great way to spend time with your family and a perfect opportunity to get portraits of motherhood, mothers to be, and even the Grandmothers. To begin with, before we grab the camera to hand, let’s take a step back for a second ** and breathe**… Mother’s Day photography requires a CONNECTION which gives your image MEANING. Furthermore, this is what keeps your image alive, and keeps the viewer’s attention, so it’s pretty vital you master and understands this before taking your shots. Mother’s Day Photography Tip: With shots that are personal and family focused, whether it’s Mother’s day, or not, the best way to get that ‘connection’ (we keep talking about) is to keep things NATURAL and CANDID! From the shots below you can see two very similarly positioned shots with a Mother and Daughter. The first, although technically very good, is very posed – it comes across a little forced, with a mountain of cheese grated on it. Secondly, the next shot is off the cuff and candid....
International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day

Celebrating ‘International Women’s Day’ in Photography International Women’s Day is March 8th and we want to help promote this great day by looking into how famous female photographers portray women. There are millions of women across the world who are still regarded as second class citizens, but progress is being made, slowly but surely. Even standing up and saying ‘this isn’t right!’ is a step in the right direction. It’s great to see women taking their rights seriously, but it’s also empowering to see women are not afraid to bring a sprinkle of ironic humour to the table at the same time. Before making any snap judgements on the imagery featured, please read through the full article; arm yourself with insiders’ knowledge, and then hopefully you’ll want to celebrate and appreciate National Women’s day along with iPhotography. Women’s rights and protests have been in the forefront of the news over recent months; everywhere we look we see “girl power”. International Women’s Day is a celebration of the economic, political, artistic and social achievements of women across the globe, and a pledge to fight gender inequality year on year. Today, we want to focus on most arguably one of the greatest and most controversial female photographers of our time… Ellen Von Unwerth Ellen von Unwerth is a photographer and director, specializing in erotic femininity. She was born in Germany in 1954, and after working as a fashion model for 10 years she decided to get her creative cap on and get behind the camera, putting the shoe on the other foot so to speak. Ellen has been lucky enough to work...