Basic Editing Workshop

Basic Editing Workshop

Basic Photography Editing Workshop Basic editing of photographs can be seen by some people as a betrayal to the pure simplicity of photography. But in truth, basic editing, retouching and manipulations have been applied to images since the birth of photography and it can be a great way to enhance your picture if it wasn’t perfect the first time around. For this basic editing workshop, we asked our lovely iPhotography students to send in some of their favourite images in their original state and also a version they’ve edited so we could compare and contrast the results. We’ve tried to pick a mixture of photographs to retouch so you can learn more about editing for specific genres. We will look at basic editing techniques for Black & White, Landscapes, Portraits, Still Life, Wildlife and Creative photographs throughout this workshop.   Top Tip – Before we begin, this basic editing workshop is all subjective. It has been designed to offer you alternative ideas on how you may edit your photos already or actions to add to your current workflow. Hopefully, it will give you little shortcuts and helpful hints for your photo editing. Black & White  The problem with a lot of black and white images is that they are simply desaturated using editing software and then nothing else happens. Black and white photographs are designed to show contrast, texture and emotion but far too often beginners use it to cover up messy colours, white balance or focus issues. Landscapes and portraits are often very good subjects to use with black and white as they are abundant with texture and emotion. With...
Top 100 iPhotographs

Top 100 iPhotographs

The Top 100 iPhotographs A Collection of the Best Images Captured by iPhotography Students from 2012-2018 Over 100,000 photos have been uploaded to the private iPhotography™ Photo Feedback Gallery by our students since our inception in 2012. It’s an integral part of the learning experience where you can earn points, medals and get your photos reviewed, critiqued and rated by world-class photographers and fellow learners alike. These images represent a collection of the best 100 photographs that have been uploaded to iPhotography™ over the past 6 years. There is no order or ranking to this gallery, it’s simply a celebration of the amazing creativity produced by our wonderful students. Luckina Staykov iPhotography Student Melissa Harding iPhotography Student Lindsay Gaspero iPhotography Student Melissa Glister iPhotography Student Phillippa Griffiths iPhotography Student Ian Nicholls iPhotography Student Kerry Hutchinson iPhotography Student Martin Knight iPhotography Student Zoe Jane Penlington iPhotography Student Deborah McPhail iPhotography Student Creo Hines iPhotography Student Ramya Ranganathan iPhotography Student Esther Rodriquez iPhotography Student Adrian Atkins iPhotography Student Andrew Nelson iPhotography Student Anne-Marie Forrest iPhotography Student Sue Hamblin iPhotography Student Dawn Ponick iPhotography Student Felicity Svensson iPhotography Student Linda Gagnon iPhotography Student Ben Chang iPhotography Student Randy Wayman iPhotography Student Nicky Thomas iPhotography Student Hilary Cooper iPhotography Student Laura Clark iPhotography Student Lynette Gittings iPhotography Student Tim Archer iPhotography Student Neil Watkinson iPhotography Student Tina Cooper iPhotography Student Nicholas Salt iPhotography Student Volodymyr Gorbunov iPhotography Student Ann McDonald iPhotography Student Maureen Nicholls iPhotography Student Kevin Clelland iPhotography Student Marc Pickard iPhotography Student Ekaterina Pokotilo iPhotography Student Elizabeth Burk iPhotography Student Chris Halton iPhotography Student Jessica Nightingale iPhotography Student Alan Parkin iPhotography Student...
Photographing Squirrels

Photographing Squirrels

The Nuttiest Day of the Year Squirrel Appreciation Day is held on the 21st January. This unusual celebration first began in 2001 in North Carolina by wildlife rehabilitator Christy McKeown, as a way of ensuring seeds and nuts were put out for the little fuzzy rodents. Fun Fact  There are many different kinds of Squirrels found almost everywhere all over the world. This means that everyone can turn their hand to photographing these furry critters (whatever the weather, and whatever the season). Squirrels are native to: • The Americas • Africa • Europe • Asia • Australia No doubt you’re asking, how on earth are iPhotography going to embrace ‘squirrel day’?! Well, with one of the iPhotography tutors being as nuts for squirrels as squirrels are for nuts – we thought it was time to get our cameras out! Are you ready to come on a winter woodland adventure? If so, pack up your nuts, pick up your camera, brace the cold and let’s get started searching for our mischievous friends. We’re going to take a little trip in to the forest and watch as the wonders of nature unfold in front of our very eyes! (Don’t worry, we’ve put together some ideas and suggestions to help you along the way…) Where to Start? Now depending upon where you live in the world, you have 2 different options: Option 1 If you have a garden featuring lots of trees and natural wildlife, you may already regularly strike it lucky with appearances from these quirky little fuzz-balls. If not, consider leaving food out in your garden or yard to entice them.   Try scattering some...
Perfect Pet Portraits

Perfect Pet Portraits

Top Tips for Capturing the Perfect Pet Portraits Aim For Natural Light When you are trying to capture that perfect pet portrait of your beloved furry friend you want to try and use natural light; a flash can scare the animal and cause unwanted red-eye. If you have studio lights then it is worth experimenting, but you may have more luck going outside, using a room full of natural light or shooting by a nice big window. Get Close or Step Back You want to carefully consider your composition when capturing your pet’s photo. Either whack the macro on and get up close and personal to capture every detail, or take a step back and encapsulate their personality in whatever scene describes them best. Pay Attention To The Eyes  Like any type of portrait photography the key to an engaging and powerful image is the eyes, it is no different with pet photography. The eyes are one of the best ways to capture emotion, for a pet portrait it’s often also the way they express themselves. Getting the eyes nice and sharp is really key to getting that perfect pet portrait. Choose Your Angle Wisely One of the most important things to remember when photographing your pet is that everyone has seen a dog from above looking down, so unless you are going to take it to the extreme, you want to get down to their level. If this means getting on your belly then so be it, one must suffer for their art on occasion. But this way you will have a better connection with your pet – so...