The Ultimate Top 10’s of Photography

The Ultimate Top 10’s of Photography

The Ultimate Top 10’s of Photography Photography can get too serious and technical sometimes and it’s good to have a little bit of light relief to remind us of the fun and joy it should bring to our lives. So that’s why we’ve researched and compiled some top 10’s, fun facts and interesting lists all about the world of photography. Most Expensive Cameras   Leica O-Series – $2,800,000 Original Daguerreotype – $793,000 Gold Plater Leica Luxus II – $620,000 Hasselblad Space Camera – $281,000 Hasselblad H5D – $48,000 Diamond Canon IXUS (One Off Exclusive) – $40,000 Panoscan MK-3 Panoramic – $40,000 PhaseOne XF IQ3 – $32,000 Leica S – $27,500 Mamiya Leaf Credo – $19,000 Most Expensive Photographs …Seriously this photograph is worth millions… Andreas Gursky – Rhein II (1999) $4,338,500 Richard Prince – Spiritual America (1981) $3,973,000 Cindy Sherman – Untitled #96 (1981) $3,890,500 Gilbert & George – To Her Majesty (1973) $3,765,276 Jeff Wall – Dead Troops Talk (1992) $3,666,500 Andreas Gursky – 99 Cent II Diptychon (2001) $3,346,456 Andreas Gursky – Chicago Board (1999-2000) $3,298,755 Richard Prince – Untitled (Cowboy) (2000) $3,077,000 Cindy Sherman – Untitled Film Still #48 (1979) $2,965,000 Edward Steichen – The Pond—Moonlight (1904) $2,928,000 10 Things You’ll Learn with iPhotography Of course, we are going to squeeze in a little bit about our wonderful iPhotography course! Here is a list of just some of the subjects that we comprehensively cover in our online training course that are essential to learning photography.   Find Out How To Use Your Camera Understand Aperture & Depth of Field Learn About Shutter Speed Best Lenses for...
Firework Photography

Firework Photography

Capturing Sparkling Firework Photography Bonfire night is almost upon us, and with that comes the fantastic photographic opportunities of capturing those explosive fireworks. Photographing fireworks is one of the more difficult subjects to capture, but when done properly the results can be just as eye-catching as the sparkling illuminations themselves. Preparing for Lift-Off The first piece of equipment to tick off your list, (apart from your camera of course), is a tripod. An equally steady surface will also do the job, anything that will make sure the camera doesn’t shake during the long exposures that you will need to use (due to the low-lighting conditions). Another accessory you might find useful is a remote shutter release. This means you won’t have to manually press the shutter button and run the risk of unintentionally knocking the camera as it starts its exposure. This could be a cable that slips in to your sync port on your camera or you could also make use of your camera’s self-timer, though this will restrict you in being able to time your photographs and capture the action when you want. Cameras with Wi-Fi may have the option to connect to your smartphone via an app. This can often be used to trigger the camera shutter remotely so that you will be able to see what your lens is seeing too. It’s like a remote LiveView function! But be aware you’ll need a Wi-Fi connection to use this setting, which is not always easy to find when you are in the middle of a field. Another handy tool to have on you is a small...
Reflection Photography

Reflection Photography

Reflection Photography Tips Reflection photography is a challenging, special type of photography that requires a decent comprehension of perspective, angles and of course an artistic eye and flair. Reflection photos can be hard to capture because they involve you looking at your perspective differently, or in a less traditional sense than you normally would. So, instead of photographing a traditional scene, why not mix it up a little? You have to start by changing your perspective – take your shots upside down. You want your viewer to look at the world from a new viewpoint. It will take time and consideration to get the perfect shots, but the end results can be extremely rewarding. Reflections can be used to add depth and interest; they can also act as a frame, for capturing an image within an image – pretty clever, and artistically original all at the same time. From reflections of trees in lakes, to shots of new buildings with their surroundings reflected within them, there are plenty of ways a photographer can shoot and use reflections to their advantage. To provide you with some new found inspiration, iPhotography™ has put together a list of ideas – we hope this will help to unleash your imagination. Puddles… they are everywhere. How many times have you passed a great big puddle in the street and tried to avoid it? This image is an example of how simple and effective this can work as a reflective image when done correctly. Great for creating atmosphere and moods within your images, using wet, damp puddles, with the right composition and filter can be...
Capturing the horizon

Capturing the horizon

“Capturing the horizon” It’s a common fact that we as humans prefer straight, leveled lines, and don’t respond well to things being off-balance or un-even. This rule is exactly the same when it comes to photography, your visual/ horizon line should always be straight. It is amazing how much of a strong impact a straight horizon adds to a photograph, equally a crooked horizon can take away from an equivalently amazing photograph. Think about how much effort we go to to hang a frame in our homes, and how much effort we go to to make sure that the frame is perfectly straight; you measure, put markings on the wall and dig out the good old spirit level to show that frame you mean business. Equally think about how frustrating it is when the frame tips slightly to the right, it really bothers you doesn’t it? The concept is exactly the same for horizons in photographs. If you’re sat there reading this thinking, “but does it really matter?” quite simply yes it does. The horizon line can really throw the focus of your whole shot. It’s a learning process, once you start to pick up on the visual horizon guides in shots you’ll get pickier with your own work. For those that are new to photography or simply enjoy taking the odd snap here or there, you may not take notice of a crooked horizon. The image above, has an obvious crooked horizon line, but instead of looking at the overall impact of the shot, the eye is drawn to how uneven the horizon line is, which causes a...