5 Quick Light Tricks

5 Quick Light Tricks

5 Quick Light Tricks Confused or intrigued by the phrase ‘Light Tricks’? Well step inside and let us cure that curiosity with our 5 quick light tricks that you can master in just one day! 1. Light Tracing Light Tracing – the art of tracing around an object, with light! If you’ve seen examples before of this light trick, then you’ll know it’s a visually stunning way of re-creating the form of any object. You’ll amaze yourself by how easy it is to make a simple household object look futuristic! All you need is an object with a distinctive shape – headphones, bicycles, flowers or a toaster for example. It’s best to get behind the object as opposed to in front. The camera needs to see the object constantly so find a decent space to work in and make sure it’s fairly dark. 2 Second Tip – Don’t choose objects that have narrow outlines such as forks, it’s hard to trace the outline precisely. It depends on the size of your chosen object, but a shutter speed of 30 seconds should be more than enough. When tracing small objects use a small light source such as a laser pen or penlight. However, you may need to go bigger with larger items and use a torch or smartphone light. Above all, make sure there’s enough battery life in it! Steady the camera, keep the ISO low (200 max) and use shutter priority mode so the aperture is taken care of. But if you prefer to use manual mode then start at f16 and adjust depending upon your results. You may...
New Course iPhotography Light Tricks

New Course iPhotography Light Tricks

Discover over 70 Brand NEW Creative Light Manipulation and Night Photography Tricks. Learn More Join Now What are Light Tricks? We’ve got all the answers right here in our introductory guide to the iPhotography Light Tricks Course. This is going to be the most fun you’ve ever had with your camera! You’ll discover over 70 mind-blowing, light manipulation tricks and techniques! Fireworks, light trails, city lights, starburst effects, night skies, star trails, lightning, wire wool, light orbs, light painting, HDR landscapes, abstract blur, creative portraits… and that’s just to start with! The ancient Greeks first used the word ‘Phos’ ‘Graphe’ (meaning light drawing) many years ago and this basic principle has been the cornerstone for creating photographs since the birth of the camera. Our cameras can only create an image when light is present but the ability to trick light in different directions, shapes, qualities, and colours makes our love of photography soar with possibilities. The Light Tricks course is all about just that – we have compiled amazing techniques, ideas, practical exercises into a fun and interactive online learning experience. Is This Course For Me? YES! It’s for everyone, including you! Whether you have just bought a camera or have spent years behind the viewfinder, this course is insightful, comprehendible and cutting edge – there is no other course like it! You’ll find thousands of new techniques, tricks and training tutorials to push your photography forward. Maybe you are getting a little jaded of taking the same landscape or portrait and want to spice things up – we’ve got all the spice you need! Ultimately this course is for...
Firework Photography

Firework Photography

Capturing Sparkling Firework Photography Bonfire night is almost upon us, and with that comes the fantastic photographic opportunities of capturing those explosive fireworks. Photographing fireworks is one of the more difficult subjects to capture, but when done properly the results can be just as eye-catching as the sparkling illuminations themselves. Preparing for Lift-Off The first piece of equipment to tick off your list, (apart from your camera of course), is a tripod. An equally steady surface will also do the job, anything that will make sure the camera doesn’t shake during the long exposures that you will need to use (due to the low-lighting conditions). Another accessory you might find useful is a remote shutter release. This means you won’t have to manually press the shutter button and run the risk of unintentionally knocking the camera as it starts its exposure. This could be a cable that slips in to your sync port on your camera or you could also make use of your camera’s self-timer, though this will restrict you in being able to time your photographs and capture the action when you want. Cameras with Wi-Fi may have the option to connect to your smartphone via an app. This can often be used to trigger the camera shutter remotely so that you will be able to see what your lens is seeing too. It’s like a remote LiveView function! But be aware you’ll need a Wi-Fi connection to use this setting, which is not always easy to find when you are in the middle of a field. Another handy tool to have on you is a small...
Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks, and Treats for your ghostly Halloween Photography With Halloween upon us, we thought it would be a great time to practise those spooky shots! Given that Halloween begins as the sun sets, this can become terrifying for us photographers, especially if you’re new to this genre. Don’t panic, it’s not the end of the world; there are various ways to overcome this horror. When the lights go out, grab your emergency torch, bring down those Christmas lights early, hunt the house for glow sticks, or simply transform your desk lamps into fearful Halloween lanterns. Halloween has lots of fantastic subjects to shoot, from the trusty Jack-O-Lantern, to the classic cackling witches over a cauldron. The tricks (and treats) to Halloween photography is not all that different to what you have been practising already. There are however some key features that you may want to keep in mind to get those frighteningly good photos: focal point, the rule of thirds, framing, angles, detail, white balance, and flash. Shutter Speed When photographing your classic Jack-O-Lantern, you may want to consider using three or four candles inside, to make sure there’s enough light in your image. However, be careful not to over or under expose the candle, as this will be the key point of our image. You could also try using coloured LED lights for an alternative, vivid effect. To make sure you capture the most detail in the pumpkin, you may need to use a slower shutter speed; this will allow more light to enter the camera, making it easier to capture your subject. You may also have...
Top 100 iPhotographs

Top 100 iPhotographs

The Top 100 iPhotographs A Collection of the Best Images Captured by iPhotography Students from 2012-2018 Over 100,000 photos have been uploaded to the private iPhotography™ Photo Feedback Gallery by our students since our inception in 2012. It’s an integral part of the learning experience where you can earn points, medals and get your photos reviewed, critiqued and rated by world-class photographers and fellow learners alike. These images represent a collection of the best 100 photographs that have been uploaded to iPhotography™ over the past 6 years. There is no order or ranking to this gallery, it’s simply a celebration of the amazing creativity produced by our wonderful students. Luckina Staykov iPhotography Student Melissa Harding iPhotography Student Lindsay Gaspero iPhotography Student Melissa Glister iPhotography Student Phillippa Griffiths iPhotography Student Ian Nicholls iPhotography Student Kerry Hutchinson iPhotography Student Martin Knight iPhotography Student Zoe Jane Penlington iPhotography Student Deborah McPhail iPhotography Student Creo Hines iPhotography Student Ramya Ranganathan iPhotography Student Esther Rodriquez iPhotography Student Adrian Atkins iPhotography Student Andrew Nelson iPhotography Student Anne-Marie Forrest iPhotography Student Sue Hamblin iPhotography Student Dawn Ponick iPhotography Student Felicity Svensson iPhotography Student Linda Gagnon iPhotography Student Ben Chang iPhotography Student Randy Wayman iPhotography Student Nicky Thomas iPhotography Student Hilary Cooper iPhotography Student Laura Clark iPhotography Student Lynette Gittings iPhotography Student Tim Archer iPhotography Student Neil Watkinson iPhotography Student Tina Cooper iPhotography Student Nicholas Salt iPhotography Student Volodymyr Gorbunov iPhotography Student Ann McDonald iPhotography Student Maureen Nicholls iPhotography Student Kevin Clelland iPhotography Student Marc Pickard iPhotography Student Ekaterina Pokotilo iPhotography Student Elizabeth Burk iPhotography Student Chris Halton iPhotography Student Jessica Nightingale iPhotography Student Alan Parkin iPhotography Student...