Top 100 iPhotographs

Top 100 iPhotographs

The Top 100 iPhotographs A Collection of the Best Images Captured by iPhotography Students from 2012-2018 Over 100,000 photos have been uploaded to the private iPhotography™ Photo Feedback Gallery by our students since our inception in 2012. It’s an integral part of the learning experience where you can earn points, medals and get your photos reviewed, critiqued and rated by world-class photographers and fellow learners alike. These images represent a collection of the best 100 photographs that have been uploaded to iPhotography™ over the past 6 years. There is no order or ranking to this gallery, it’s simply a celebration of the amazing creativity produced by our wonderful students. Luckina Staykov iPhotography Student Melissa Harding iPhotography Student Lindsay Gaspero iPhotography Student Melissa Glister iPhotography Student Phillippa Griffiths iPhotography Student Ian Nicholls iPhotography Student Kerry Hutchinson iPhotography Student Martin Knight iPhotography Student Zoe Jane Penlington iPhotography Student Deborah McPhail iPhotography Student Creo Hines iPhotography Student Ramya Ranganathan iPhotography Student Esther Rodriquez iPhotography Student Adrian Atkins iPhotography Student Andrew Nelson iPhotography Student Anne-Marie Forrest iPhotography Student Sue Hamblin iPhotography Student Dawn Ponick iPhotography Student Felicity Svensson iPhotography Student Linda Gagnon iPhotography Student Ben Chang iPhotography Student Randy Wayman iPhotography Student Nicky Thomas iPhotography Student Hilary Cooper iPhotography Student Laura Clark iPhotography Student Lynette Gittings iPhotography Student Tim Archer iPhotography Student Neil Watkinson iPhotography Student Tina Cooper iPhotography Student Nicholas Salt iPhotography Student Volodymyr Gorbunov iPhotography Student Ann McDonald iPhotography Student Maureen Nicholls iPhotography Student Kevin Clelland iPhotography Student Marc Pickard iPhotography Student Ekaterina Pokotilo iPhotography Student Elizabeth Burk iPhotography Student Chris Halton iPhotography Student Jessica Nightingale iPhotography Student Alan Parkin iPhotography Student...
Photographing Squirrels

Photographing Squirrels

The Nuttiest Day of the Year Squirrel Appreciation Day is held on the 21st January. This unusual celebration first began in 2001 in North Carolina by wildlife rehabilitator Christy McKeown, as a way of ensuring seeds and nuts were put out for the little fuzzy rodents. Fun Fact  There are many different kinds of Squirrels found almost everywhere all over the world. This means that everyone can turn their hand to photographing these furry critters (whatever the weather, and whatever the season). Squirrels are native to: • The Americas • Africa • Europe • Asia • Australia No doubt you’re asking, how on earth are iPhotography going to embrace ‘squirrel day’?! Well, with one of the iPhotography tutors being as nuts for squirrels as squirrels are for nuts – we thought it was time to get our cameras out! Are you ready to come on a winter woodland adventure? If so, pack up your nuts, pick up your camera, brace the cold and let’s get started searching for our mischievous friends. We’re going to take a little trip in to the forest and watch as the wonders of nature unfold in front of our very eyes! (Don’t worry, we’ve put together some ideas and suggestions to help you along the way…) Where to Start? Now depending upon where you live in the world, you have 2 different options: Option 1 If you have a garden featuring lots of trees and natural wildlife, you may already regularly strike it lucky with appearances from these quirky little fuzz-balls. If not, consider leaving food out in your garden or yard to entice them.   Try scattering some...
“What is Abstract Photography?”

“What is Abstract Photography?”

What is Abstract Photography? Abstract photography… it’s a bit like marmite, you either love it or hate it. But let us consider why that is? Abstract photography can be intimidating to photographers because of the amount of freedom that comes with it. The rules are….well, there are no rules! You know the saying: “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”, well abstract photography is exactly what the viewer makes it, and it can hold many different interpretations, views and opinions. There has never been an exact definition of what exactly ‘abstract photography’ is; similar to abstract art, it offers many different ways of looking at a subject. The image itself will not be literal, so the subject comes second to actually “seeing”. There is often no clear cut definition of what the object could be, leaving a great element of mystery surrounding the subject – could there be more to it than meets the eye? Abstract photography can be really fun. It’s a great way of seeing day to day objects in a different light. It provides the opportunity to look at an object in more detail. Shots are often visually interesting (as well as creative), which is great news for those who like to explore and think outside of the box. Is Abstract Photography for You? As we know, any kind of photography is subjective and everyone has different opinions and responses. The only way you’ll ever really know is to give it a go! One of the advantages of shooting abstract shots is it’s so inexpensive, you don’t need to source objects or spend money on...
Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

“Location, Location, Location” So you’ve decided to broaden your horizons and venture out into the big wild world, but you aren’t too sure where to begin.   It’s entirely up to you where you want to shoot, you might feel really passionate about a certain type of location or setting or just be spell bound at the vast amount of things you can shoot. Location shots always help to tell a story, think about what kind of story you want to tell, or mood you want to depict. Whether that be a romantic beach setting or an eerie, dark forest scene, you are only limited by your imagination. Scout Out Your Location To begin with we would suggest going on a location scout, you don’t need to be a fully fledged brownie scout to do this either. For the day you’re going to put yourself in Dora’s shoes, grab your camera and your friend and simply go exploring. As you know you don’t always “see” things the same way you see through the camera, so it’s important to take various shot of different locations on your travels to gauge a feel if the location is right for you. It’s like a first date, if you aren’t feeling it or the vibe isn’t right, get up and go, you haven’t made a commitment to that location after all! It’s handy to have a friend by your side, not just for the company! Friends or family members can be a great source of practice if you are choosing to use a model or subject in your photo then see how this could...
Capturing the horizon

Capturing the horizon

“Capturing the horizon” It’s a common fact that we as humans prefer straight, leveled lines, and don’t respond well to things being off-balance or un-even. This rule is exactly the same when it comes to photography, your visual/ horizon line should always be straight. It is amazing how much of a strong impact a straight horizon adds to a photograph, equally a crooked horizon can take away from an equivalently amazing photograph. Think about how much effort we go to to hang a frame in our homes, and how much effort we go to to make sure that the frame is perfectly straight; you measure, put markings on the wall and dig out the good old spirit level to show that frame you mean business. Equally think about how frustrating it is when the frame tips slightly to the right, it really bothers you doesn’t it? The concept is exactly the same for horizons in photographs. If you’re sat there reading this thinking, “but does it really matter?” quite simply yes it does. The horizon line can really throw the focus of your whole shot. It’s a learning process, once you start to pick up on the visual horizon guides in shots you’ll get pickier with your own work. For those that are new to photography or simply enjoy taking the odd snap here or there, you may not take notice of a crooked horizon. The image above, has an obvious crooked horizon line, but instead of looking at the overall impact of the shot, the eye is drawn to how uneven the horizon line is, which causes a...