Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks, and Treats for your ghostly Halloween Photography With Halloween upon us, we thought it would be a great time to practise those spooky shots! Given that Halloween begins as the sun sets, this can become terrifying for us photographers, especially if you’re new to this genre. Don’t panic, it’s not the end of the world; there are various ways to overcome this horror. When the lights go out, grab your emergency torch, bring down those Christmas lights early, hunt the house for glow sticks, or simply transform your desk lamps into fearful Halloween lanterns. Halloween has lots of fantastic subjects to shoot, from the trusty Jack-O-Lantern, to the classic cackling witches over a cauldron. The tricks (and treats) to Halloween photography is not all that different to what you have been practising already. There are however some key features that you may want to keep in mind to get those frighteningly good photos: focal point, the rule of thirds, framing, angles, detail, white balance, and flash. Shutter Speed When photographing your classic Jack-O-Lantern, you may want to consider using three or four candles inside, to make sure there’s enough light in your image. However, be careful not to over or under expose the candle, as this will be the key point of our image. You could also try using coloured LED lights for an alternative, vivid effect. To make sure you capture the most detail in the pumpkin, you may need to use a slower shutter speed; this will allow more light to enter the camera, making it easier to capture your subject. You may also have...
Basic Editing Workshop

Basic Editing Workshop

Basic Photography Editing Workshop Basic editing of photographs can be seen by some people as a betrayal to the pure simplicity of photography. But in truth, basic editing, retouching and manipulations have been applied to images since the birth of photography and it can be a great way to enhance your picture if it wasn’t perfect the first time around. For this basic editing workshop, we asked our lovely iPhotography students to send in some of their favourite images in their original state and also a version they’ve edited so we could compare and contrast the results. We’ve tried to pick a mixture of photographs to retouch so you can learn more about editing for specific genres. We will look at basic editing techniques for Black & White, Landscapes, Portraits, Still Life, Wildlife and Creative photographs throughout this workshop.   Top Tip – Before we begin, this basic editing workshop is all subjective. It has been designed to offer you alternative ideas on how you may edit your photos already or actions to add to your current workflow. Hopefully, it will give you little shortcuts and helpful hints for your photo editing. Black & White  The problem with a lot of black and white images is that they are simply desaturated using editing software and then nothing else happens. Black and white photographs are designed to show contrast, texture and emotion but far too often beginners use it to cover up messy colours, white balance or focus issues. Landscapes and portraits are often very good subjects to use with black and white as they are abundant with texture and emotion. With...
Multiple Exposure

Multiple Exposure

Ghostly Halloween - Multiple Exposure Photography Last week, we set you a ‘multiple exposure’ weekend challenge. We were really impressed with those students that got involved and had a go; it was obvious to us which students had worked past Module 14 of the iPhotographyCourse – so a huge well done! Here is a selection of images from our students: However, we also received many messages from students asking for additional assistance and more information on how to create these impressive images. As usual, we have listened to our students’ requests, and thought Halloween weekend would be the perfect time to teach these atmospheric effects. Hopefully, by the end of this blog post, you will be ready to create some hauntingly mysterious images, all ready for this weekends Halloween challenge. It’s a sign of the times when 20 years ago, digital photography was still very much an infant, and 35mm film was the popular high-school kid; taking 2 photographs accidentally on the same frame was deemed a school boy error. Two decades on and we find ourselves purposely setting out to re-create those old mistakes using artistic vision, through the newly immerse trend of Multiple Exposure art. Please Note: You’ll hear both double, and multiple exposure talked about; as long as it’s more than one image exposed on to the same frame, then you’re still working and thinking along the right lines. This resurgence of trendy multiple exposure (ME) portraits started back a few years ago, and it’s been slowly rising since. So much so, that camera manufacturers like Canon, Nikon, Sony and Fuji have built in creative functions...
Create Your Own Little World

Create Your Own Little World

A step-by-step guide to creating your own ‘little world’ using the Polar Coordinates Filter in Photoshop by Natalia Medd (iPhotography Student) I always liked those round creations which look like your own little world, and wanted to try to make one. I finally did. Here is a step-by-step quide of how I made it, using the Polar Coordinates filter in Photoshop. First, we will need to choose the image to work with. Ideally it is supposed to be a 360 panoramic shot, but it is not absolutely necessary. The trick is to get the edges of your image to match perfectly when they are connected in the end. You can make two types of images using this technique: your own little planet, looking something like this: Or an “inside out” version which can look like a portal: or tunnel: 1. Let’s start with the first version of little planet. I had a panoramic shot which I made using the panorama setting on my cell phone. It looked like this: To get our little planet we will have to flip the image upside down. To do so go: Image>Image Rotation>Flip Canvas Vertical Now we have an upside down image: Next, we will need to resize our image and make it square. Go to: Image>Image size and set for width the same number your height is. Just copy and paste it. Remember to uncheck “Constrain Proportions”: Click ok, and now we have a square upside down image. It does not look too impressive, but we have one more step to do. Go to Filter>Distort>Polar Coordinates Choose Rectangular to Polar: Click OK....