Stories From Behind the Camera: Iconic Portraits

Stories From Behind the Camera: Iconic Portraits

Stories From Behind the Camera: The World’s Most Iconic Portraits Some iconic photographs last longer in the mind because of the subject. There’s nothing more interesting to people than other people. In our inaugural insight of ‘Stories from Behind the Camera’, we will look at some of the world’s most iconic portraits and reveal the interesting stories that made them iconic. Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry (1984) Sharbat Gula is captured by photojournalist McCurry in a Pakistani refugee camp during the time of the Soviet Union’s occupation of Afghanistan. Although, Sharbat wasn’t identified as the girl until 2002 by which time she was in her 30’s. The portrait is revered for a number of reasons. Some cite it is the ‘Mona Lisa of the Third World’ and others say it is a depiction of oppression on society. This photograph was first published on the front cover of National Geographic in 1985 and became an instant talking point. Gula’s red headscarf and the green background is striking, along with her piercing stare underlining McCurry’s ability as a photojournalist. Gula was eventually credited as the Afghan Girl in 2002 using iris recognition technology. She can still remember the moment that McCurry took the photograph. Copyright: Steve McCurry (1984) Copyright: Dorothea Lange (1936) Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange (1936) Taken in the middle of America’s Great Depression, Lange’s portrait of Florence Owens Thompson and her children shows the effects that hyperinflation and lack of employment had on the American people during the 1930s. Thompson was only 32 in the portrait but is often mistaken for a lot older. Generally, this is an attribute of...
Life on the Streets: The Secrets of Street Photography

Life on the Streets: The Secrets of Street Photography

Life on the Streets: The Secrets of Street Photography Are you the kind of person who loves to ‘people watch’? Are you looking to push your street photography into the public domain? Would you like to learn to capture life in its purest form? Well, then you need to read these essential tips and tricks to mastering the intriguing art of Street Photography. Street photography has been the foundation for so many famous portrait and landscape photographers over the years. Its increase in popularity with new photographers is no surprise due to the boom in social media. Yet if you ask any photographer “what is street photography?” you are guaranteed to get a different response each time. That’s what is so brilliant about this genre of photography. What is Street Photography?  There are no ‘rights’ or ‘wrongs’ with street photography. Just like there are no right ways to go about writing a book or painting. It is entirely about sharing your own vision as a photographer with your audience, showing them a snippet of life on the streets through your camera’s eye. Street photography can be quite similar to documentary pictures, that show images of people living in certain situations or societies around the world. You as the photographer should aim to mirror society as you see it. The reason street photography is so successful is because of the emotion and connection a stranger can make with the camera. A successful street photographer knows how to evoke emotion from the audience, hit you in the gut, and bury a lasting memory in your mind. Sometimes, these style of images...
Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks and Treats for Halloween Photography

Tips, Tricks, and Treats for your ghostly Halloween Photography With Halloween upon us, we thought it would be a great time to practise those spooky shots! Given that Halloween begins as the sun sets, this can become terrifying for us photographers, especially if you’re new to this genre. Don’t panic, it’s not the end of the world; there are various ways to overcome this horror. When the lights go out, grab your emergency torch, bring down those Christmas lights early, hunt the house for glow sticks, or simply transform your desk lamps into fearful Halloween lanterns. Halloween has lots of fantastic subjects to shoot, from the trusty Jack-O-Lantern, to the classic cackling witches over a cauldron. The tricks (and treats) to Halloween photography is not all that different to what you have been practising already. There are however some key features that you may want to keep in mind to get those frighteningly good photos: focal point, the rule of thirds, framing, angles, detail, white balance, and flash. Shutter Speed When photographing your classic Jack-O-Lantern, you may want to consider using three or four candles inside, to make sure there’s enough light in your image. However, be careful not to over or under expose the candle, as this will be the key point of our image. You could also try using coloured LED lights for an alternative, vivid effect. To make sure you capture the most detail in the pumpkin, you may need to use a slower shutter speed; this will allow more light to enter the camera, making it easier to capture your subject. You may also have...
Black and White Photography Tips & Tricks

Black and White Photography Tips & Tricks

Black and White Photography Tips & Tricks Many camera lovers adore black and white photography, and it is often thought of an upper-class style of imagery. It is, after all, the very root of modern photography and can make an image look classical and sophisticated. What Makes a Good Black and White Photograph? Capturing a strong, effective black and white image can be extremely satisfying. Great black and white photography relies heavily on a good understanding of tone, texture and contrast. Far from being boring, black and white images can be dramatic and emotive – if you know what you are doing! Before you start on a B&W adventure, you really need to appreciate and understand how tones in B&W work, compared to coloured images. This is because when you take a picture and convert all the colours into shades of grey, suddenly the lighting, tone, contrast, shape, and texture become the major striking elements. Of course, there are some subjects that work better in black and white than others, such as portraits and architecture.   Why these subjects though? Firstly, for portraits, black and white enhances emotion and feeling, the distracting colour is all stripped away, and it allows the audience to connect with the subject’s eyes, body and expression. With architectural photography, buildings demonstrate their best shape and form in black and white. Therefore, it can help us to see their strong structural lines in clear definition away from the background, providing you’ve positioned the camera correctly! Subjects such as flowers, food, close-ups and abstract photography don’t always work as well. There is a necessary level of colour...
Top 100 iPhotographs

Top 100 iPhotographs

The Top 100 iPhotographs A Collection of the Best Images Captured by iPhotography Students from 2012-2018 Over 100,000 photos have been uploaded to the private iPhotography™ Photo Feedback Gallery by our students since our inception in 2012. It’s an integral part of the learning experience where you can earn points, medals and get your photos reviewed, critiqued and rated by world-class photographers and fellow learners alike. These images represent a collection of the best 100 photographs that have been uploaded to iPhotography™ over the past 6 years. There is no order or ranking to this gallery, it’s simply a celebration of the amazing creativity produced by our wonderful students. Luckina Staykov iPhotography Student Melissa Harding iPhotography Student Lindsay Gaspero iPhotography Student Melissa Glister iPhotography Student Phillippa Griffiths iPhotography Student Ian Nicholls iPhotography Student Kerry Hutchinson iPhotography Student Martin Knight iPhotography Student Zoe Jane Penlington iPhotography Student Deborah McPhail iPhotography Student Creo Hines iPhotography Student Ramya Ranganathan iPhotography Student Esther Rodriquez iPhotography Student Adrian Atkins iPhotography Student Andrew Nelson iPhotography Student Anne-Marie Forrest iPhotography Student Sue Hamblin iPhotography Student Dawn Ponick iPhotography Student Felicity Svensson iPhotography Student Linda Gagnon iPhotography Student Ben Chang iPhotography Student Randy Wayman iPhotography Student Nicky Thomas iPhotography Student Hilary Cooper iPhotography Student Laura Clark iPhotography Student Lynette Gittings iPhotography Student Tim Archer iPhotography Student Neil Watkinson iPhotography Student Tina Cooper iPhotography Student Nicholas Salt iPhotography Student Volodymyr Gorbunov iPhotography Student Ann McDonald iPhotography Student Maureen Nicholls iPhotography Student Kevin Clelland iPhotography Student Marc Pickard iPhotography Student Ekaterina Pokotilo iPhotography Student Elizabeth Burk iPhotography Student Chris Halton iPhotography Student Jessica Nightingale iPhotography Student Alan Parkin iPhotography Student...